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United Methodist Church Makes Major Contribution

22 April 2016   10:44   news   912 visit   0 comments

GENEVA – The United Methodist Church’s contribution to the Global Fund has reached US$20 million, strongly supporting malaria programs in most-affected countries in Africa.

 

“We thank the United Methodist Church for their relentless efforts in the fight against malaria,” said Mark Dybul, Executive Director of the Global Fund. “This is the largest contribution ever received from a faith-based organization and it’s extremely encouraging to see partners of all sectors coming together to eliminate malaria.”

 

The people of The United Methodist Church and the Global Fund joined forces in the fight against malaria through the Imagine No Malaria campaign, which aims to raise US$75 million to address the impact of malaria in Africa through prevention, treatment, communication and education.

 

Bishop Thomas J. Bickerton, chair of the United Methodist Global Health Initiative, announced the latest contribution to the Global Fund ahead of World Malaria Day, April 25.

 

“Our financial commitment is an affirmation of efforts of faith-based organizations in the fight against malaria, tuberculosis and AIDS,” Bishop Bickerton said. “Churches exist in the smallest, most remote villages, where there are no roads or electricity. They have presence and influence. We are committed to encouraging these communities to support the Global Fund and national efforts to fight the diseases of poverty.”

 

With more than 12.5 million members across the globe, including a strong membership presence on the continent of Africa, the people of the United Methodist Church are working to engage the entire denomination in the fight against malaria to make a life-changing difference.

 

Faith-Based Organizations are critical providers of health care in many parts of the world and play an important role in reaching the hard-to-reach and poorest population groups. Faith-Based Organizations are also strong advocates for global health and program implementers, and thanks to the United Methodist Church also important funders of health programs.

 




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